Quality requirement 8: Providing personal care and support

Health and social care services work together to provide care and support that enables people with LTNCs to achieve maximum choice about living independently at home.

Integrated health and social care support designed to offer choice about living independently at home

 

Information and advice about options for personal care and support

 

 

Indicators of progress

Abbott and Carpenter (2009) and Jackson (2011) both report that, when Direct Payments worked, they did seem to give greater choice about the timing and flexibility of care, as well as who provides it.

Pooled data from Jackson’s 2001a and 2001b studies revealed that 23% of the 424 adults cared for and 7% of their carers received Direct Payments. The introduction and use of these payments seems to have enabled a range of services to be accessed, both for the adult cared for and carers. However, some were confused about what the payments could be used for. Others experienced long bureaucratic delays, or they were deterred by the complexity of paperwork and processes.

In Fitzpatrick et al’s survey respondents were asked about whether they had been offered help from health and social services in two areas, housework and personal care (dressing, washing, eating):
housework; over three quarters (79%) either did not feel they needed help or received help from other sources. Of the remaining respondents, just over half (52%) had not been offered help from services and would have liked it.
personal care; 76% of the sample either did not feel they needed help or received help from other sources. Of the remaining respondents, 16% had not been offered help and would have liked it.

Inhibitors of progress

Bernard et al (2010) found that where no CINRTs, nurse specialists or day services were reported, there were no commonly available alternative models of care co-ordination for people with LTNCs across case study sites.
Bernard et al also report certain challenges to working together between organisations and professions, including:

  • financial pressures that could make organisations more inward-looking

  • incompatible information systems and assessment processes

  • poor communication between staff

  • cultural barriers

  • staffing levels, turnover and capacity

Hoppitt et al (2011) found that less than half of their combined sample (N=211) reported having a social worker who co-ordinated their care, while the remainder relied on informal carers.

 

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